Funding for Conservation Is Money Well Spent

When we invest in conservation, we see wildlife population increases and endangered species recovery. Additional funding will allow states to replicate conservation successes across thousands of other species of greatest conservation need.

Western States: Sage-Grouse

Western states have conserved more than 5.6 million acres of sage-grouse habitat on private land.

Sweeping Conservation Reforms Have Yielded Great Successes

Raptors

Our national bird, an icon of wildlife recovery: In 1970 there were just a few hundred Bald Eagle pairs left in North America—a 99% loss. Conservation programs and species protections sparked a remarkable recovery. The Bald Eagle was delisted as an Endangered Species in 2007, and today 50,000+ eagle pairs live in the U.S.A. Map shows current bald eagle abundance by season based on ebird data. photo by Tom Mast/Macaulay Library.Map shows current Bald Eagle abundance by season based on eBird data. Photo by Tom Mast/Macaulay Library.

Hawks, eagles, and other birds of prey buck the general trend of declining birds thanks to bans on harmful pollutants such as DDT, as well as strong federal and state protections from shooting. Overall, raptor populations have grown by 200% since 1970. This group indicates what a big difference states can make in species protection. Probably the most outstanding example is the Bald Eagle.

Our national bird is an icon of wildlife recovery. In 1970 only a few hundred Bald Eagle pairs remained in the lower 48 states. Federal and state protections sparked a remarkable recovery. The Bald Eagle was delisted as an endangered species in 2007, and today 30,000+ eagle pairs live in the U.S.A.

Waterfowl

Waterfowl have seen a 56% increase in populations in 1970, and represent one of America’s best wildlife success stories. This group serves as a model for how habitat protection and restoration can reverse bird declines. Its recovery owes thanks to federal investments such as the Duck Stamp and North American Wetlands Conservation Act that powered waterfowl conservation efforts. Map shows current Wood Duck abundance by season based on ebird data. Photo Linda Rudolph.Map shows current Wood Duck abundance by season based on eBird data. Photo by Linda Rudolph.

Waterfowl have seen a 56% increase in populations since 1970, and represent one of America’s best wildlife success stories. This group serves as a model for how habitat protection and restoration can reverse bird declines. Its recovery owes thanks to federal investments such as the Migratory Bird Stamp (Duck Stamp) and the North American Wetlands Conservation Act, which powered waterfowl conservation efforts.

Colorado & Nebraska: Mountain Plover

In Colorado and Nebraska, 1,000+ Mountain Plover nests have been saved.

Texas: Wild Turkey

In Texas, Wild Turkeys are worth $42 million to the Lone Star State economy.

Great Lakes: Kirtland’s Warbler

In the Great Lakes, the endangered Kirtland’s Warbler population has soared by 1,100%.

Appalachia: Cerulean Warbler

In Appalachia, 200 landowners became Cerulean Warbler champions.

Eastern States: American Oystercatcher

Eastern states see a a total turnaround—American Oystercatcher populations are up 23%.

Hawaii: Palila

In Hawaii, the endangered Palila population has stabilized.

Alaska: Emperor Goose

In Alaska, conservation measures for Emperor Geese succeeded to the point that the hunting tradition was revived.